Amazon has announced the opening of three new delivery stations in New Jersey, one in Edison, one in Lawrence, and one in Carlstadt.

The Carlstadt location is the largest of the three at 464,000 square feet, the Lawrence site is 340,000 feet, and the Edison facility is 280,000 square feet. Delivery facilities are, according to an Amazon release, “the last mile of Amazon’s order process and help speed up deliveries for customers. Packages are shipped to a delivery station from neighboring Amazon Fulfillment and Sortation Centers, loaded into delivery vehicles and delivered to customers.”

Delivery stations offer entrepreneurs the opportunity to build their own business delivering Amazon packages, as well as independent contractors the flexibility to be their own boss and create their own schedule delivering for Amazon Flex. Combined, the three stations will collaborate with eleven Delivery Service Partners.

Amazon says that they have created 49,000 jobs in New Jersey since 2010 alone, and has invested $14.5 billion in the state including infrastructure and compensation. The three new stations will provide both full and part time positions, all paying at least $15 an hour. It will also mean hundreds of new driving jobs to support the facilities.

To mark the three openings, Amazon made donations to One of Us, The Bag Project, and Edison Public Library.

In addition to the three new stations, Amazon operates 14 Fulfillment and sortation centers, 21 Whole Foods Market locations, 1 Amazon Hub Locker+ location, 1 Amazon Books store, and 9 onsite solar locations.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Doyle. Any opinions expressed are Bill Doyle's own.

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