It's pothole season!

Where are the worst of the worst potholes that you see driving, whether it's around Ocean and Monmouth County or across the state?

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While you write up a list, the NJ DOT is getting back to work on repairing some potholes with a little patchwork.

The New Jersey Department of Transportation and Commissioner Diane Gutierrez-Scaccetti announced their annual statewide campaign to repair potholes across the state is now underway.

Potholes are created by water seeping into cracks in the asphalt and then expanding when it freezes, Gutierrez-Scaccetti explains, and that winter is usually pretty rough on roads and rings especially true after the February snow.

“NJDOT crews work year-round to repair potholes and keep our highways in good condition, but at this time of year it becomes our primary focus, especially after the winter that we have had,” Gutierrez-Scaccetti said. “We are beginning the New Jersey Department of Transportation’s annual pothole campaign today, and will continue for the next couple of months until we have repaired the most significant potholes from this winter.”

She explains that crews will close travel lanes where necessary during the day in certain areas and where possible and "will try to avoid working in travel lanes carrying traffic in the peak direction during peak times."

"As the weather warms up and asphalt plants reopen, our crews will start to perform permanent patch operations on particularly problematic sections of roadway. This is more extensive work that includes milling and paving a small area of the road, and generally will be done overnight," Gutierrez-Scaccetti said.

The DOT is off pace for fixing potholes, during a normal fiscal year they average 195,965 potholes repairs per year.

Right now, in fiscal year 2021 which goes from July 1, 2020 – March 1, 2021) the NJ DOT repaired about 90,639 potholes.

"In addition to our crews monitoring and reporting potholes that need repair on state highways, we encourage motorists to report potholes as well," Gutierrez-Scaccetti said.

If you see a pothole, you can call 1-800-POTHOLE or go online to report potholes on state roads.

If you see potholes on county roads, the NJ DOT asks that you contact the appropriate jurisdiction.

You can follow Vin Ebenau on Twitter and Instagram and email news tips to vin.ebenau@townsquaremedia.com.

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