I’ve been eyeing Jeeps lately and there’s a good reason why.

The new clear lid makes it the coolest car ever. My niece has been driving a Jeep since the fall, and as the summer approaches she's been preparing herself for the day she decides to remove the hood.

It’s not that she’s dreading removing the hood, rather she’s not sure how she feels about the wind being blown in her face every time she decides to drive the car. It is also a lot of work to continuously attach and detach the top, which is why she sought out a solution.

As she was doing research on Jeep tops in general, she stumbled upon this great product that will give her the gorgeous summer views she wants without all of the wind in her face.

The clear lid, sold by ClearLidz, goes on top of your Jeep and is a one-pieced transparent panel. The panel is easy to install and provides users with beautiful 180 degree views of the sky from the comfort of their air conditioned vehicle.

This is perfect for drives to the beach or any kind of road trip that you anticipate will have a beautiful view. While these lids can be pricey, they are a great investment if you want to take advantage of your Jeep in the summer and either don’t want to drive roofless, or have some other concern. There are also many other transparent lids for cheaper prices online, but ClearLidz will provide you with the most durable hood.

The clear lids are completely shatter proof and UV protective, meaning there is no glare, and you don’t have to worry about any sort of impact on the hood of your car. You can read more about ClearLidz here. You’ll never have a Jeep ride like this!

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Judi Franco. Any opinions expressed are Judi Franco’s own.

NJ cracks down on polluters at these 9 sites

State environmental officials are working to get several property owners to clean up their acts around New Jersey, including in Middlesex, Mercer and Atlantic Counties.

Illegal dumping and gas and chemical contamination of water and soil are among the issues at hand in the state's lawsuits and requested court orders.

Seven lawsuits focused on "overburdened" communities address pollution in Camden, Trenton, Kearny, Secaucus, Edison, Bridgeton and Egg Harbor City, while two additional cases are based in Butler and Vineland.