As the number of people getting vaccinated in New Jersey grow, will proof be needed for travel and getting into concert and sports venues? The jury is out.

The White House on Monday ruled out the creation of a national “vaccine passport” for Americans, saying it is leaving it to the private sector to develop systems for identifying who's been vaccinated. Other countries are establishing national databases to allow vaccinated people to resume normal activities.

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There is concern that some people will not get vaccinated if the government is monitoring, according to White House COVID-19 adviser Andy Slavitt.

Camden County Commissioner Director Louis Cappelli Jr. is all in on such a use for the vaccination cards. He believes that proof will be “imperative” for travel and attending entertainment venues and urged people to keep it safe like a driver’s license.

“Receipt of this vaccine is and will be critical for the future of our new normal during this pandemic,” Cappelli said.

Rutgers University announced that students attending class on campus for the new academic year in September will have to provide proof of vaccination; it's optional for faculty and staff.

Gov. Phil Murphy said he is open to the idea and hinted that the card should be kept in a safe place but wants to see what guidance the CDC issues.

"Don't get rid of the card. That's likely to be something valuable. Laminate it and put it in your wallet," Murphy said during a March 19 appearance on CNBC's "Squawk Box," adding that it's actual value is yet to be determined.

"There are lots of potential uses for that whether it's going to a sporting event, getting on a place, etc.," Murphy said.

Staples will laminate a card at no charge this week, according to ABC 7 Eyewitness News, while Office Depot will laminate the card for free with this coupon.

There are some who suggest not laminating the cards as they include blank lines for additional or booster shots.

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